Kavanaugh

“The reputation you develop for intellectual and ethical integrity will be your greatest asset or your worst enemy. You will be judged by your judgment. … Treat every pleading, every brief, every contract, every letter, every daily task as if your career will be judged on it… There is no victory, no advantage, no fee, no favor, which is worth even a blemish on your reputation for intellect and integrity. … Dents to the reputation in the legal profession are irreparable.” (Vince Foster, commencement address at University of Arkansas law, May 8, 1993)

In July 1993, Vincent Walker Foster Jr., a lifelong friend of a fella named Bill Clinton, transition team worker for that particular executive, and deputy White House Counsel, died.

Foster had been depressed and was prescribed the antidepressant trazodone over the phone by his Arkansas doctor. The next day, Foster was found dead at Fort Marcy Park in Virginia.

His autopsy determined that he was shot in the mouth.

No other wounds were found on his body.

Foster’s death was officially investigated five times, once by the United States Park Police and the FBI; once by Independent Counsel Robert B. Fiske; twice by Congress; and once by Independent Counsel Ken Starr.

By October 1997, Starr’s office concluded what all the other investigations did: Vince Foster took his own life.

For several years before that conclusion, though, the driving force behind Starr’s office’s interest in Foster’s death was a 30-year-old lawyer named Brett Kavanaugh.

Yep, the fella who fought for his life today in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee to become a United States Justice was at one time one of the prime movers and shakers of the fukakta idea that Bill and Hillary Clinton murdered their longtime friend and close adviser.

That’s the guy who today called Christine Blasey Ford’s charges “a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election.”

Kavanaugh was one of the original conspiracy engineers. He lit on fire the libelous notion that the President of the United States murdered his friend. And one foolish conspiracy theory carries others across the threshold. The President is a secret Muslim and wasn’t even born here. Death panels. FEMA camps. Benghazi. What about her emails. Lock her up.

And now, even at the precipice of working under the same roof where folks like Warren Burger and Thurgood Marshall toiled, he still can’t stop relying on the wickedest motors of humans.

I think Kavanaugh will be confirmed.

I don’t know if I think he shouldn’t be due to Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony.

But I do think he shouldn’t be confirmed because this is a guy who 50 years ago would have been running the mimeograph machine to hand out this week’s study of the Protocols at the meeting. Kavanaugh has proven himself to be an enormous part of the problem that is breaking this country. And he did nothing today to mitigate that concern.

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