The Good Fight

Weekends are weirdly abstract when your work shift is Sunday through Thursday, 9:30 p.m. to 6:15 a.m. as has been my experience since June. This particular weekend is no exception. I pretty much slept all of Friday, got out of bed, watched Real Time with Bill Maher, then went back to bed. I woke up about 6 a.m. Saturday and played with the cat. There are a few errands that might get done today and hopefully a lunch with Dad / phone call with Mom.

I wanted to mention that if you watch the television program The Good Fight and you’re enough of a fan to want to discuss the show online, there is a Facebook group for that. Unlike many Facebook groups, this bunch of fans seem to generate some smart discussion.

Spoiler alert. Spoiler alert. There might be some uh, spoilers.

Season 6 is two episodes in on its Paramount+ platform. It’s been a weird ride. They seem to be going for a disconnected vibe that flirts with feeling like the dream sequence from season 4, but there’s been no reveal, so it’s not a dream. As I posted in Fans of the Good Fight on Facebook:

I have not been in on the current season yet. The premiere did not fish me in so much. Ask me when I got fished in by the current season. Just ask me.

Christine Baranski on an elevator holding a sunflower singing from West Side Story.

I’m in.

So they’re doing something interesting on the show. There are protests in the streets all around, and some of the protesters are tossing fake grenades into the elevators. The first time this happens is episode 1, and all who are on the elevator react as one would expect. By episode 2, Eli Gold grabs the thing and hands it to the receptionist without any sense of danger, so these things are becoming quite normal. The grenades all have a message printed warning of escalated protests on 11/10.

Why 11/10? I think this can be explained in a seemingly unremarkable conversation in episode 2 between Diane Lockhart and Eli Gold. As I posted in the Facebook group:

It is interesting that the show is taking part in real time, apparently. In episode 2, Diane asks Eli what the date is, and Eli responds that it is September 15, which is the date episode 2 originally aired. November 10 is a Thursday, which means that episode will be available for streaming on the real November 10. Whatever they have in store for us, it’s probably going to happen in episode 10.

Noting also that November 10 is two days after Election Day. I think they might be setting us up for an art-imitates-life moment on The Good Fight.

Parenthood, the soundtrack

I have been on a watching binge of the 2010 television series Parenthood. This is largely due to a recent urgent need to keep myself going through the night as my work shift has gone from my nice cushy evening shift to a shift that propels me to work from sunset to sunrise Sunday through Thursday. When on such a shift, boredom is a real creeper. It’s six seasons of wonderful family wholesome. Like Eight is Enough without the cheesy morality tales, and while we all love Betty Buckley, Bonnie Bedelia steams the joint up a bit more as the matriarchal Mrs. Braverman.

As music plays a vital role in this program (a central storyline is that the brothers Crosby and Whathisname run a recording studio together, but the show overall uses music to great effect), I half-thought about procuring a Spotify playlist based on the many eclectic tunes used throughout. Before making the effort, though, I thought I’d see if some other obsessive soul had previously done the work.

Runfaster19, you are the man. Person. Whatever. What a comprehensive playlist you created. Congratulations.

Spoiler: He Was Jacking Off

The Good Wife

Episode nine, season two, “Nine Hours.” Zach encounters Kalinda for the first time when she knocks on the door and he answers. She is wearing a purple leather coat and a black skirt. And the boots. Always the boots. He answers the door, as she is on her mobile phone. “You work with my mom?” She replies “yeah” and blasts right by him.

Later, Zach knocks on Alicia’s door and gestures his need for the bathroom. Alicia gestures come on through. As he goes into the bathroom, Zach’s eyes go all over Kalinda, head to toe.

After a few minutes, Zach is seen kind of stumbling out of the bathroom.

I wonder what Zach was doing in the bathroom. Oh, who am I kidding. I was 14 once. I know what Zach was doing in the bathroom.

Cecily Strong Saves The Universe

Once in a while, a performer does a thing that is astonishing, sublime, real, and of such a quality that it has to make their colleagues perk up their noses into the air and understand that a a new floor has been established in the expectations of their shared craft.

This was, for example, recognized as such when comedian Tig Notaro revealed a certain diagnosis to her audience.

This performance garnered praise from her colleagues, her audience, and generally. As The Guardian wrote at the time: “It’s a startling release; one that redefines the boundaries of what comedy can achieve.”

Or like Prince at the Super Bowl in 2016.

I feel that on this past SNL episode, long-running cast member Cecily Strong achieved such a moment with her appearance on “Weekend Update” as “Goober the Clown Who Had an Abortion When She Was 23.”

There is the brilliant absurdity of the personage of a clown there to discuss the matter at hand, and yet the absolute sense of it. Why does our society allow ourselves to be so held hostage regarding this topic that its mere discussion among polite company is rendered impossible? Then there is her demeanor throughout, the frustrated frazzle of it all. This clown’s next step may be to go outside and to light something on fire, and why isn’t every clown at that point now?

SNL doesn’t often endeavor to make statements as it does to achieve caricatures or to just be outright silly. Cecily Strong with this sublime appearance used the silly to punch hard. Any of her colleagues who don’t view this thing as the new benchmark for their craft, well, they’re doing it wrong.

Cecily Strong just played “Purple Rain” in a torrential downpour.